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Hemophilia

Co-Pay Relief Program Fund Notices

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Status
Closed

This fund is currently closed to new and renewal applications due to lack of sufficient funding. CPR allocates funding to all patient’s that are approved for a grant so that it is available when needed by the patient. Therefore, during the period that a fund is closed to new applications, CPR continues to provide support to all patients in those funds that have an active award. Funds reopen often so please continue to visit our Disease Fund page to check the status of the fund.

Fund Type

Co-pay, Co-Insurance & Deductible

Maximum Award Level

$12,500 Per Year

Eligibility Requirements
  • Household Income Requirements 400% or less of Federal Poverty Guideline (FPG) (adjusted for Cost of Living Index (COLI) and number in household)
  • Insurance Requirements All Insurance Types
  • Must reside and receive treatment in the United States.

About Hemophilia

Hemophilia is an inherited bleeding disorder in which the blood does not clot properly. There are two types of hemophilia both of which are caused by different mutations on the X chromosome. Hemophilia A is caused by a lack or decrease in factor VIII, a specialized blood protein necessary for blood clotting. People with this disorder experience prolonged bleeding or oozing following an injury, surgery, or having a tooth pulled; internally bleeding often occurs in the muscles and joints. The disorder can be severe, moderate or mild, with 50-60% of people having the severe form of the disease. The disease is more common in males, and affects people from all racial and ethnic backgrounds. Hemophilia A is also called classic hemophilia or Factor VIII deficiency hemophilia and is four times as common as hemophilia B. Hemophilia B is caused by a lack or decrease in factor IX, which is needed for blood clotting. Individuals with Hemophilia B tend to bleed longer not faster than unaffected individuals, with bleeding often occurring in the muscles and joints. The disorder can be severe, moderate or mild based on the activity level of factor IX. Hemophilia B is also called Christmas Disease or Factor IX deficiency. There is an unusual form known as Hemophilia B Leyden that has excessive bleeding in childhood but causes few problems after puberty. The disease is more common in males, and affects people from all racial and ethnic backgrounds.

Medication & Financial Assistance Resources
The Patient Advocate Foundation's (PAF) Co-Pay Relief (CPR) Program does not review the information contained on the website links provided for content, accuracy or completeness. Use of and access to this information is subject to the terms, limitations and conditions as outlined on the accessed websites. PAF Co-Pay Relief Program makes no representation as to the accuracy or any other aspect of the information contained on any website accessed from the CPR website, nor does PAF Co-Pay Relief Program necessarily endorse the website information provided. The information presented on the PAF Co-Pay Relief website is provided for general information only and is not intended as a substitute for medical care. Please talk with your healthcare provider about any information you acquire from this or any other website accessed through the PAF Co-Pay Relief program website.
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