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Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

Status
Closed

This fund is currently closed to new and renewal applications due to lack of sufficient funding. CPR allocates funding to all patient’s that are approved for a grant so that it is available when needed by the patient. Therefore, during the period that a fund is closed to new applications, CPR continues to provide support to all patients in those funds that have an active award. Funds reopen often so please continue to visit our Disease Fund page to check the status of the fund.

Fund Type

Co-pay, Co-Insurance & Deductible

Maximum Award Level

$4,000 Per Year

Eligibility Requirements
  • Household Income Requirements 400% or less of Federal Poverty Guideline (FPG) (adjusted for Cost of Living Index (COLI) and number in household)
  • Insurance Requirements Medicare, Medicaid, or Military Benefits
  • Must reside and receive treatment in the United States.

About Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

Colon, or colorectal, cancer is cancer that starts in the large intestine (colon) or the rectum (end of the colon). According to the American Cancer Society, colorectal cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths in the United States. However, early diagnosis can often lead to a complete cure. Almost all colon cancer starts in glands in the lining of the colon and rectum. When doctors talk about colorectal cancer, this is usually what they are talking about.

There is no single cause of colon cancer. Nearly all colon cancers begin as noncancerous (benign) polyps, which slowly develop into cancer. You have a higher risk for colon cancer if you:

•Are older than 60
•Are African American of eastern European descent
•Eat a diet high in red or processed meats
•Have cancer elsewhere in the body
•Have colorectal polyps
•Have inflammatory bowel disease (Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis)
•Have a family history of colon cancer
•Have a personal history of breast cancer
Certain genetic syndromes also increase the risk of developing colon cancer. Two of the most common are:
•Familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP)
•Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC), also known as Lynch syndrome

What you eat may play a role in your risk of colon cancer. Colon cancer may be associated with a high-fat, low-fiber diet and red meat. However, some studies have found that the risk does not drop if you switch to a high-fiber diet, so this link is not yet clear. Smoking cigarettes and drinking alcohol are other risk factors for colorectal cancer.”

Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Resources
Medication & Financial Assistance Resources
The Patient Advocate Foundation's (PAF) Co-Pay Relief (CPR) Program does not review the information contained on the website links provided for content, accuracy or completeness. Use of and access to this information is subject to the terms, limitations and conditions as outlined on the accessed websites. PAF Co-Pay Relief Program makes no representation as to the accuracy or any other aspect of the information contained on any website accessed from the CPR website, nor does PAF Co-Pay Relief Program necessarily endorse the website information provided. The information presented on the PAF Co-Pay Relief website is provided for general information only and is not intended as a substitute for medical care. Please talk with your healthcare provider about any information you acquire from this or any other website accessed through the PAF Co-Pay Relief program website.
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